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Things that matter to lesbian, gay and bisexual people

Lesbian, gay and bisexual people have one thing in common – their love and sexuality is still not accepted everywhere. Also, their experiences are very diverse.

“I’m gay, and that’s a good thing!” This is a simple but well-known sentence, because it sums up in a nutshell three virtues shared by sexual minorities: courage, the will to self-assertion and joy of life. The above sentence was famously announced by Klaus Wowereit, who shortly afterwards became the governing mayor of Berlin.

It is the common experience of all LGB people that their love and sexuality is not accepted everywhere. LGB people are forced several times in their lives to ask themselves whether they want to come out and can they subsequently expect good reactions. “For me, this is the right moment”, declared Thomas Hitzlsperger, Germany’s first openly gay (ex) national football player after he came out in public about his sexuality. Hitzlsperger triggered a big debate about homophobia in sport.

All LGB people are shaped by the experience of belonging to a minority. Aside from this, they come in as many categories as heterosexuals.

LGB people with children or who desire to have children are interested in other issues different from those who do not have children. For example, the former are concerned about legal obstacles in adopting children of their partners or they have questions about how to realize the desire to have their own children: “This was of course the obstacle. Where do we find a man?”, explains the lesbian mother Folke.

As a lesbian with migrant identity, internationally renowned German-Turkish DJ Ipek has also experienced discrimination from other LGB people. And that’s why it's important to her that in Germany today there are associations where LGB and transgender people from other cultural backgrounds than those from the majority society can meet. “This is very beautiful and it is quite an achievement. We didn’t have that back in the day.”

Older LGB people on the other hand think about how they can live in a community of LGB people also in old age: “To be honest, I would love to live somewhere where there are more gay people. I simply feel much more comfortable,” explains Kurt, a pensioner. The lesbian couple Barbara (72) and Barbara (76) enjoys going to a recreational centre in Düsseldorf that is mainly frequented by heterosexual pensioners: “People accept us here the way we are and we put our rainbow flag on the table and—c'est ça!", they say.

Many bisexuals network with one another within the LGB community because they are subject to special forms of discrimination. One of such prejudices says Maddi (27), is that bisexuals constantly want to have sex all the time and everywhere.

But bisexuals also have good experiences. The reactions to their coming out were “very cool”, recounts the YouTuber JANAklar.

All LGB people are shaped by the experience of belonging to a minority. Aside from this, they come in as many categories as heterosexuals.

LGB people with children or who desire to have children are interested in other issues different from those who do not have children. For example, the former are concerned about legal obstacles in adopting children of their partners or they have questions about how to realize the desire to have their own children: “This was of course the obstacle. Where do we find a man?”, explains the lesbian mother Folke.

As a lesbian with migrant identity, internationally renowned German-Turkish DJ Ipek has also experienced discrimination from other LGB people. And that’s why it's important to her that in Germany today there are associations where LGB and transgender people from other cultural backgrounds than those from the majority society can meet. “This is very beautiful and it is quite an achievement. We didn’t have that back in the day.”

Older LGB people on the other hand think about how they can live in a community of LGB people also in old age: “To be honest, I would love to live somewhere where there are more gay people. I simply feel much more comfortable,” explains Kurt, a pensioner. The lesbian couple Barbara (72) and Barbara (76) enjoys going to a recreational centre in Düsseldorf that is mainly frequented by heterosexual pensioners: “People accept us here the way we are and we put our rainbow flag on the table and – c'est ça!", they say.

Many bisexuals network with one another within the LGB community because they are subject to special forms of discrimination. One of such prejudices says Maddi (27), is that bisexuals constantly want to have sex all the time and everywhere.

But bisexuals also have good experiences. The reactions to their coming out were “very cool”, recounts the YouTuber JANAklar.